Monthly Archives: January 2016

Recent AFOW Board Meeting Awards $73,000 to Whistler Charities

At the December, 2015 AFOW Board meeting more than $73,000 was granted to several Whistler non-profits, including: Whistler Search and Rescue, Canadian Society of Mountain Medicine, Whistler Community Services Society and Whistler Sailing Association.

AFOW mission is to raise and distribute funds for health and human services, culture and the arts, environmental protection and outdoor recreation, to enhance the community, benefit the population and foster greater understanding and friendship between the Canadian and American people.

Members of AFOW believe Whistler is an extraordinary place, and that by becoming involved philanthropically in the community, the community benefits, and AFOW members gain by becoming more closely associated with the local people and issues.

Since its founding in 2002, almost $1.4 million has been raised and distributed to local charities.

For more information about AFOW go to http://www.afow.org or follow us on Facebook.

AmericanFriendsofWhistler_4x4_FN

Radar the Rescue Dog, 2nd Edition with New Foreword

radar

The second edition of Radar the Rescue Dog is out with one major change – the foreword is now written by “The Right Honourable Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau”, who spent time in Whistler as a snowboard instructor.

A grant from AFOW helped make this publication happen.

CPR Devices Made Possible by AFOW Grant

A generous donation from American Friends of Whistler to the Canadian Society of Mountain Medicine has resulted in two CPR machines for the Sea to Sky Corridor and Whistler area.

These devices, which will provide automatic CPR, even during a toboggan or helicopter rescue, will be strategically located for quick access by the WB Ski Patrol and Search and Rescue teams in the Sea to Sky Corridor/Whistler area.  “We know that continuous, effective CPR cannot be provided by human providers in rescue situations”, says Dr. Dave Watson of the Canadian Society of Mountain Medicine, a non-profit organization that trains mountain physicians and advanced mountain paramedics.  “The key to survival”, says Watson, “is uninterrupted, high quality CPR and the ZOLL Autopulse will do this”.

In addition to treating victims of heart attack, the Autopulse is essential gear for treating patients in cardiac arrest secondary to hypothermia. “This are otherwise healthy, usually young people”, says Bruce Brink, an Advanced Care Flight Paramedic with the Whistler/Blackcomb Ski Patrol and member of the CSMM.  “Hypothermic patients in cardiac arrest need continuous CPR for the entire duration of transport to the specialized care available only in Vancouver and there is good medical evidence that these folks may walk of the hospital, after their hypothermic cardiac arrest, with a potentially long, healthy future”.

The Canadian Society of Mountain Medicine (CSMM) represents Canada at the International Commission for Alpine Rescue and at the International Society of Mountain Medicine.  CSMM, in collaboration with the UBC Faculty of Medicine, also provides formal training for Physicians, Advanced Paramedics and Nurse Practitioners which leads to the internationally recognized Diploma in Mountain Medicine.

For further information:

info@mountainmedicine-canada.org